Skip to main content

About your Search

20130107
20130115
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
's a message for you. the f.b.i. has seized your office. and i called george frampleton. i don't know. he was the one i could reach. and i got on a 6:00 a.m. flight the next morning to come back to participate in discussions of what the office should do because what had hampled was he fired archie. he did not fire us. so there was a lot of discussion of do we quit in protest or do we say, ok, archie's gone but we're still here. we need to do our job. and we're going to stay. he's going to have to make a second big public relations error by firing us. >> what did he do? >> well, what happened is that they actually closed the office for nano second and then reopened it and robert bork who then was solicitor general and acting attorney general at that point because everybody above him had either been fired or had resigned. he became the head of this -- of the special prosecutor's office. i interviewed him for the library and he said look -- he said i, robert was nervous because he said, i could be charged with obstruction of justice if i closed it down. he kept it alive and they hired leon w
in the story is hilarious. >> head of the fbi at the time. >> who is going to take a personal interest in whether there is a homosexual ring, a gay ring, at the center of the nixon administration. he was the deputy assistant to the president, a good-looking california guy. >> here we are -- i can remember going home, you are scared to death. this is like a time bomb. this gets in the press and anderson gets going -- it is a disaster for all of us. and it is not true. the next day, each of us individually go into the cab that and sit across, right across -- we are sworn in. and then each of us is questioned by j. edgar hoover. he asks all of the questions -- the transcript of this was provided to jack anderson. that is how it was stopped. >> and hoover was planning to give this to anderson? >> no. anderson was going to go with the story -- jack anderson, the columnist. he was the one who is going to put the photographer down there and -- i have always thought, if i ever see brit hume i will ask him, because he was working for anderson at the time. anderson is getting ready to go for the
of leaped over the counter and said, there is a message for you. the fbi has seized your office. i called george rampant -- heat -- frampton, he was the one i could reach. i got on a light the next morning to participate in discussions of what the office should do. what happened is he fired archie -- he did not fire us. there was a lot of discussion of, do we quit in protest or do we say, ok, archie is gone but we are still here. we need to do my job and we need to stay. he will have to make a second big public-relations error by firing us. >> what did he do? >> what happened is that they closed the office for a nanosecond and then they reopen debt and robert bork, who was then solicitor general and acting attorney general because everybody about him had been fired or had resigned, he became the head of this, of this special prosecutor's office. i interviewed him -- he said, i was nervous because i could be charged with obstruction of justice. he kept it alive and they hired someone else, a texas democrat -- nixon hired him to replace archibald cox. in the end he would be even tougher on
at sigtarp. our role is to provide oversight decreed in a premier enforcement agency, and many fbi to police the program and catch criminals who steal from it. the second purpose the oversight mechanism or redo reports to congress every quarter and special reports and specialized to do a specific t.a.r.p. program. c-span: what educator authority? gusto from congress, the legislation. it provided all the authorities of any inspector general, which are similar oversight agencies attached to the departments and agencies of the federal government. c-span: you say you weren't terribly impressed by the inspector general in town. how many are there? >> guest: i think 6465. when i first came out to washington, i didn't know what in igd. my experience with this prosecutor we seldom would run into on force and arms that agents and for a while lives in mortgage mortgage fraud cases. i was dealing with the inspector general from hud, which were very good nonperson nations. i didn't have a picture of an eye she was doing and when i got the job, one of the first things they did was meet the different ig's
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)